August202014

awesomenerdyfangirl:

anonymous-dudette:

I’m glad that Ferguson is getting attention, seriously I am, but I haven’t seen ONE post about what is happening over seas. Not even one post about the pictures above. Children are being beheaded and dragged into the streets where they are then shot because their families are Christian. Women are being raped and murdered. Men are being murdered. PEOPLE are dying. It’s a Christian Holocaust. And I haven’t seen anything on Tumblr.

Why aren’t any of you furious about this?! Where’s the “social justice?” ISIS is murdering people who don’t convert to Islam (yes, I know they’re extremists and not all Muslims are like that. Save yourself the rant) but I really want to know why this hasn’t been given the attention it deserves.

Seriously, guys. This is really scary, and we need to raise attention for these people. They so desperately need our prayers and support.

(via catherinedefrance)

July22014
June302014

captaineli:

smaugy-adventures:

captaineli:

smaugy-adventures:

juilan:

The Fault in Our Czars: The Execution of the Romanov Family

That’s the thing about revolutions - they demand social and political change.

"It’s a metaphor; see? You put the revolting thing right inside your political structure, but you don’t give it the power to make its changes"

I toppled the aristocracy the way you fall asleep; slowly, becoming exhausted and frustrated, and then all at once.

Revolution?

Revolution

3PM
Finally finished my Pitt app today!!

Finally finished my Pitt app today!!

June292014

Reblog If You Ever Used One Of These or Just Know What It’s Called

bdnocampo:

narxinba:

damfrozencupcakes:

greystreetliving:

spooky-tenshi:

reblogthings:

image

HOW DOES THIS HAVE SO FEW REBLOGS you people are making me feel so old and I’m really not even an adult yet.

we still have one of these in my house… it doesn’t get used, but we still have it.

do people really not remember…..?

Oh look, my childhood

I actually still have this exact one at home

(via do-brave-things)

June262014
June172014

Reblog this for a Tumblr blog match

justdontwordshurt:

justdontwordshurt:

justdontwordshurt:

I kinda ship some blogs with other blogs in hopes that one day you’ll follow each other. So anyone who reblogs this I will pair you up with another blog who I think you are compatible with. Please I’ll do them all!

JUNE 21, 2014 IS THE DEADLINE. THE COUNT DOWN BEGINS.

5 DAYS LAST CHANCE REBLOG ONCE

(via bambigabs)

4PM

Introduction to the Series, “Who’s Who: U.S. Diplomats in 1914”

historyatstate:

One hundred years ago sounds like an eternity, but the world of 1914 was strikingly modern: one could communicate by telegraph and telephone; travel the world via railway, ship, and automobile; marvel at the wonders of airplanes, motion pictures, and skyscrapers; and see late into the darkest of nights thanks to electricity.

Yet, the conduct of U.S. foreign policy abroad looked quite different in 1914—there was no Foreign Service! A modern, professionalized Foreign Service was not established until the Rogers Act of 1924. Instead, U.S. representation abroad was conducted by the Diplomatic Service, responsible for carrying out U.S. foreign policy and protecting U.S. citizens and property, and the Consular Service, charged with furthering U.S. economic and commercial interests.

Map of Europe, 1914

This month, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of World War I, the Office of the Historian will run a Tumblr series to (re)introduce the gentlemen—and yes, there were no female diplomats at the time—who served as U.S. Ambassadors and Ministers at key posts across Europe in 1914.

What was the difference between an “Ambassador” and “Minister”? Read our short explanation here

June92014
June62014

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): D-Day (1944)

The largest seaborne invasion in military history took nearly two years to plan. Talks of establishing a beachhead as a means of retaking occupied Europe from the Nazis, began in August 1942. Known officially as Operation Overload, the landings on coast of the French province of Normandy would involve over 13,000 paratroopers (the most ever), nearly 7000 naval craft, and 156,000 ground troops from twelve countries.

The Germans were convinced that the Allied invasion would occur at Pas de Calais which was located at the shortest distance from England on the English Channel and was also the shortest distance to Paris. The Allies confirmed this assumption by creation of the fictional First United States Army Group, led by General George Patton. Nazi forces were then strengthened at Pas de Calais while leaving Normandy less defended.

The invasion began on June 5, 1944 with the delivery of 13,000 paratroopers into France by plane and glider. Unfortunately four of the five designated landing areas were not properly marked and since the drops were between 11:00 pm and 3:00 am local time, the troops found themselves widely scattered, reducing their effectiveness in attacking the Germans inland.

While parachutes were deployed from above, a naval force comprised of 6,939 ships and nearly 200,000 naval personnel began to transport troops from England to Normandy. Once in place, a naval bombardment began at 5:50 am, when there was light enough to see. 

American forces began sending troops ashore at 6:30 am onto two beaches, codenames Omaha and Utah. The British and Canadian-led forces landed at Juno, Sword, and Gold beaches an hour later, as planned.

Because of heavy cloud cover and rough seas the landing was disorganized. Some landing craft stopped too far away from shore and hundreds of troops died as they drowned in the rough waters of the channel. Several tanks simply sank into the water immediately, taking entire crews with them. At Utah beach the 4th Infantry Division (US) was pushed 2000 yards south of their landing point because of rough currents. 

The weather also effected air support. Two thousand American and British bombers were supposed to lay cover for invaded troops but cloud cover, especially at Omaha beach, made this difficult for fear of hitting their own soliders.

The Nazi resistance was fierce. Although made up almost entirely of conscripts from outside of Germany, the four divisions defending Normandy and the surrounding area had the superior defensive position. They killed many soldiers as they trudged their way through neck-high water or rough waves and crawled across exposed beaches.

Fighting at Normandy lasted ten hours or more. When fighting ended on June 6, although beaches were secured,  the Allies had not achieved their goal of established a front line 6-10 miles west of the coast. It would take more than a month, in some cases, to take territory and towns that were originally to be captured on D-Day.

The beachhead established by the Allies was the first step in re-taking Occupied Europe from Nazi forces. However it would take eleven more months of brutal fighting before the Germans finally surrendered on May 8, 1945.

The casualites from the Normandy invasions are difficult to determine. The official number is 8,443 Allied troops killed our wounded, but estimates range as high as 12,000. Utah beach had the lowest casualty rates, suffering only 197 confirmed injured or killed, while at Omaha estimates are near 2000. Canadian troops suffered the highest proportional casualty rates with 900+ killed or injured during their taking of Juno beach. The best estimates on troops killed on June 6, 1994 is between 3,000 to 4,400.

American dead from D-Day, as well as those killed in action following June 6 on French soil, are buried in the Normandy American Cemetery. The cemetery has 9,387 burial plots as well as a memorial to more than 1500 U.S. troops declared missing in action. 

The bodies of 4,848 soldiers who fought for England, Canada, Australia, and other Commonwealth countries, are buried in the Bayeux Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery. 

France donated the land for both cemeteries to the the United States and United Kingdom, respectively, in perpetuity.

Sources: Wikipedia, US Army D-Day page, Yahoo.com, CNN, and warchronicle.com

(Images: Top, Allied troops disembark for the invasion of Normandy, Robert F. Sargent/Getty Images, courtesy of The Guardian; Second from top, Allied soldier killed on Omaha Beach, courtesy the National Archives, vai wikimedia.org; center left, an American soldier recovering the dead after D-Day, Walter Rosenblum, courtesy of cimsec.org; center right, a soldier writes out the names of the dead on canvas bags that will later hold their bodies for burial, courtesy National Archives via www.americaninwwii.com; bottom, the bodies of soldiers who drowned just feet from shore when their heavy packs dragged them under, courtesy The National Archives, via www.americainwwii.com)

Other relevant posts on Obit of the Day:

Ronald Fitzgerald - Member of the RAF who served as secretary to the D-Day plannng group

Dr. Lee Peters - The last surviving naval doctor to serve at Omaha beach

Joseph Vaghi, Jr. - The last surviving “beachmaster” from D-Day

Mollie Weinstein - Member of the WAC, and one of the first women to visit Normandy following D-Day

Members of the “Band of Brothers,” who were part of the Airborne force that landed in Normandy on the night/early morning of June 5-6, 1944:

"Buck" Compton

"Wild Bill" Guarnere

Edward “Bab” Heffron

Frank Perconte

Dick Winters

(via acatholicvibe)

3PM
3PM

todaysdocument:

#DDAY70 D-Day:

"Until the last possible moment our planes hit at the enemy on the shoreline… The Air Forces did not neglect targets inland. Everything that could hinder our advance were subject to attack from the sky…"

Excerpted from: “D-Day to D plus 3."  From the series: Moving Images Relating to Military Activities, compiled 1947 - 1964. Record Group 111: Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer, 1860 - 1985

3PM
smithsonian:

Today in 1944: American troops land at Omaha Beach for the invasion of Normandy, France, known as D-Day. Robert Capa was one of two magazine war correspondents allowed to join the U.S. troops landing on the shores of Normandy. Dodging bullets and hiding behind pieces of steel, Capa photographed for hours in waist-deep water with several cameras. His hands trembled, and he ruined many rolls of film as he tried to change film amid the dead and wounded of the battle. His photos were sent directly to the offices of LIFE in London for processing. Hurrying to develop the rolls, a technician turned up the heat in the dryers, ruining many of the 72 images taken. Only 11 survived.
More from our Museum of American History

smithsonian:

Today in 1944: American troops land at Omaha Beach for the invasion of Normandy, France, known as D-Day. Robert Capa was one of two magazine war correspondents allowed to join the U.S. troops landing on the shores of Normandy. 

Dodging bullets and hiding behind pieces of steel, Capa photographed for hours in waist-deep water with several cameras. His hands trembled, and he ruined many rolls of film as he tried to change film amid the dead and wounded of the battle. 

His photos were sent directly to the offices of LIFE in London for processing. Hurrying to develop the rolls, a technician turned up the heat in the dryers, ruining many of the 72 images taken. Only 11 survived.

More from our Museum of American History

(via historicaltimes)

June12014

Finals week begins tomorrow!  It’s almost Summer!

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